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How much sugar is in your alcohol?

47403431 - glasses of cocktails on bar background The Festive Season is almost upon us – Christmas events and parties are here and is this a time to forget about what we eat and drink or should we remain aware, if not concerned about what we are putting away?

I’m always talking about sugar and how harmful it is and when looking at alcohol we can’t forget about the amount of sugar it contains – or does it?

Well it’s not all bad news, a small glass of white wine only has one-and-a-half teaspoons, while a small red is even better, with just a quarter of a teaspoon.

Prosecco, one of my favourites, contains less than a teaspoon of sugar and lager is the most surprising as it contains only one gram of sugar per pint – but that is 4 teaspoons!

Spirits have no sugar – it is of course the mixers that are most damaging to you. In fact the difference between a rum and coke and a small glass of white wine is a staggering seven teaspoons of sugar!

It would appear that manufacturers of alcoholic drinks are making them sweeter in order to appeal to young Brits many of whom who have been raised on sugary energy drinks.
A report from trade magazine The Grocer, found that the most popular drinks amongst young adults today are things like vodka and red bull, fruity wines, or expensive beers with an added spirit, as opposed to the traditional pint of lager or gin and tonic.
Young brits today consume far too much sugar and their need for sweeter alcoholic drinks just adds more weight to the knowledge that sugar is more addictive than cocaine!

Alcohol Awareness Week will run from 14th to 20th November 2016. This year’s theme is “Knowing the Risks”.
The aim of Alcohol Awareness Week is to get people thinking about alcohol – how it affects us as individuals, families, communities and society as a whole.
Did you know that alcohol is linked to over 60 medical conditions? Damage from alcohol extends much further than the liver, it can cause high blood pressure and is also linked to diabetes, depression and cancer and brain damage.

However, sometimes it can be altogether too easy to disassociate yourself from the problems, thinking: “That will never happen to me.”

The Mail Online presented alcohol in a bit more of a visual way and showed the consumption of calories – although I think most women are well aware of this! I know people who refuse desert so they can have a couple more glasses of wine! Although I realise that calorie intake is nowhere near as serious as cancer, replacing your alcohol will sugary items can have just a serious impact on your health!

So a bottle of wine is 625 calories OR the equivalent of:

• 8.8 digestives biscuits
• 25 Dairy Milk squares 47661880 - broken, natural black chocolate bar isolated on white background, top view
• 6.5 bags of cheesy Wotsits

Whilst a pint of beer is 204 calories OR the equivalent of:

• 2.8 digestives biscuits
• 8.1Dairy Milk squares
• 2.1 bags of cheesy Wotsits

Liquid calories are easily ignored, with many people thinking that if you’re not eating it, it doesn’t count – which, of course, is a big mistake.
My advice is to enjoy the festivities but to be mindful of your health and remain mindful while you eat and drink – is that extra biscuit, chocolate or glass of wine really necessary?

Until next time,

Huge hugs and here’s to a great festive season without too much sugar!,

Jillxx

Jill is an Independent Consultant with Arbonne International and the views expressed are her own based on Internet research. Jill is not a scientist, nutritionist or skincare expert but is passionate about helping people understand more about how to look after their body, skin and about the ingredients in Health and Wellness products. If you would like to know more please complete the form in the side bar and I will send you regular information and blog posts.

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